Porsche Panamera: September’s Car of the Month

Let’s say you have a Porsche 911 in one hand. It’s a sports car (or arguably a supercar if you have the GT2 RS) that is built for performance and the track. In the other hand you have an IKEA Store, which is large, and filled with expensive items and furniture. Two very separate things that have their own goals and purposes. Now, put the two together and you get the Panamera. Plenty of space on the inside, fast, and “well furnished”. Can’t you see already why it’s Car of the Month?

The Panamera Purpose

The Porsche Panamera is a sports luxury executive car that provides the performance that Porsche fans know and love as well as space and luxury that rival the flagship BMW 7 Series. Upon its release to the public in 2009, it received plenty of praise for what it did best, which was provide the ultimate four seat comfort and luxury experience, along with ample trunk space.

Unfortunately, its power side didn’t provide a Porsche performance experience, and that made up the majority of its criticism. Luckily for those craving some extra horses, there is a wide selection of models to choose from here in 2020, ranging from the 325hp Panamera 4 to the 620hp Turbo S model. It would be hard to say a 2.9 second 0-60 doesn’t live up to the 911.

Past Panameras

Despite the first generation model being released in 2009, the Panamera’s roots go all the way back to the 80’s. It began with the development of the Porsche 989, which was set to be released in the early 90’s. Just like the Panamera its goal was to provide Porsche performance while having more space in the interior, and if you look up images of it there are some striking similarities to the Panamera’s design. The 989 was all set up to be officially produced but the head of the project left Porsche, leaving it a dead project…

…until the debut Panamera came along in 2009, wearing a title referencing the old Carrera Panamericana race. It certainly provided a sense of luxury, and the sheetmetal had a familiar “Bangle” look to it. From there it went on the road that the BMW 6 Series traveled by refining its looks (2013 Facelift). Unlike the 6 Series, instead of looking like a different model entirely today, it followed the Porsche design present in all of the other models. In my opinion, the current second generation of Panamera achieved the original goals of performance plus practicality.

Why it’s the Car of the Month

The Porsche Panamera deserves the title of Car of the Month for not only accomplishing its goal a hell of a lot faster than the Fisker Karma from last month, but for also showing Porsche’s ability to adapt to the current changing times, where SUVs and other practical vehicles are on the rise.

Congratulations, Panamera

The Scoring Board

Performance: 7.5 | Luxury: 9 | Looks: 7.5

Performance: Why it gets a 7.5

The Panamera gets a 7.5 in Performance for hitting 0-60 in 2.9 seconds with the high end model, despite it being on the heavier side of vehicles. Impressive, in my opinion.

Luxury: Why it gets a 9

The Panamera gets a 9 in Luxury because sometimes it’s praised to be one of the most comfortable cars in it’s segment, and it also packs in more luxury interior bits than Porsche’s coupe and cabriolet models.

Looks: Why it gets a 7.5

The Panamera gets a 7.5 in Looks because I enjoy the Bangle BMW cars and it strongly reminds me of them. The second generation also looks great since it uses the Porsche styling seen on the 911 and Cayman.


Image Credits

Panamera: Porsche, Mad4Wheels

Panamera GTS (First two images): Porsche, Mad4Wheels

Hyundai Veloster: A Tale of Four Doors

A Grey Veloster Turbo drives into the spotlight

So, let’s inspect the Hyundai Veloster. An affordable hatchback? Check. Unique sheetmetal? Check. Four doors? Check. Read over those again. Did you notice something wrong about that last one? If not, time to be surprised.

What is it?

The Hyundai Veloster is one of many entries into the hatchback list, but for some reason it’s classified as a coupe to some? I’m not sure why but for the sake of the article I’m calling it a hatchback because that’s primarily what it is. Now earlier I mentioned that it was a 4 door hatchback. I’m sure you’ve seen 3 or 5 door hatches, but 4? That’s because the Veloster has one door on the driver’s side, and two on the passenger’s side. Add the hatchback part and that’s 4 doors.

Now for the big question, why? Well, Coastal Hyundai says that there are three doors for the convenience of the driver. The door on the driver’s side is actually larger, so the driver can get in easier. The extra passenger side door is made for easy accessibility, where in normal 2 door cars, you’d have to climb into the back seat from the front door. To sum it up, having 4 doors total helps everyone out, while maintaining the lower price of a small hatchback.

Performance

Until the second generation of Veloster, it was disappointing that it didn’t really have an engine to match its looks. Now we have the optional Theta 2.0 liter engine that packs 271 horsepower into it, effectively providing the above criteria. The car also has its rally and track versions participating in races, and both look great.

To Conclude…

…the Hyundai Veloster is a small sporty hatchback that’s accessible for both driver and passenger, while also offering performance variants that provide a long awaited “fast engine”. The asymmetric styling certainly makes it stand out from other cars if one is observant enough to notice, and it conveys its asymmetry well. It reminds me of the Murcielago days (hopefully you understand). Thanks for a great hatchback, Hyundai.

Image Credits

2011 Hyundai Veloster: Hyundai, Mad4Wheels

2012 Hyundai Veloster Turbo: Hyundai, Mad4Wheels